5 steps to take towards gender equality
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With the global goal of achieving gender equality by 2030, there’s no better time to take action than now. Lasting change begins at the grassroots level and we can all play a part. 

For International Women’s Day, Janelle Weissman, the Executive Director of UN Women National Committee Australia, discussed some steps that could take us forward.

  1. Support the organisations that support women

“We need to ensure women’s organisations - big and small - are adequately resourced. Every contribution helps these vital organisations to deliver essential programs and services, and to exert pressure when needed on lawmakers that feeds into good policy making, policy implementation and accountability.”

  1. Work with businesses that are closing the pay gap

“We live in an age where we can often find at our fingertips the track records of businesses and products. Use this wealth of information to make better choices. Do your homework in your next job - search and prepare questions about their track record on gender equality. Pursue opportunities with companies that match your values; organise and advocate for change within your workforce whenever necessary.

“In Australia, we are fortunate to have the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA), which produces comprehensive reports. They also cite employers with the WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality Award. Commonwealth Bank is among the winners. Get to know them, and if your employer isn’t on the list, find out why. Boss shop. Vote with your feet.”

  1. Advocate for the political empowerment of women

“While the percentage of women represented in parliaments around the world has doubled in the past 20 years, today, just 23% of parliamentarians are women. In terms of earnings, globally, women earn 24% less than men.

“In Australia, both of these statistics are more promising, but we’re far from achieving 50/50 representation in parliament and closing the wage gap. Contact your elected representatives, make your views on policy heard and actively investigate opportunities to serve on councils, boards, and to run for elected office. We need courageous leaders, willing to set ambitious targets around women’s representation as decision-makers, to inch closer to 50/50 representation.”

  1. Volunteer in your community

“There are countless organisations in our own backyard that are doing vital work to create better opportunities for women and girls in Australia and around the world. The riders in UN Women’s Ride for Rights are examples of everyday women and men who have taken up a personal fitness challenge to cycle hundreds of kilometres and raise $3,000 or more in support of UN Women’s work.

“Having cycled in the inaugural Ride for Rights last year, each rider made a big impression on me, given their big hearts and commitment to women and girls in need. And on the ride, they had a chance to witness UN Women’s work in action.”

  1. Help our government support developing nations

“The Australian Government’s foreign aid program has gender equality and women’s empowerment at its core, and is often providing direct aid to governments and strengthening the capacity of governments to improve opportunities and safety for women. Encouraging your MP and Senator to advocate for Australia’s continued support of UN Women, other UN agencies, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), and grassroots groups is an important step to improving policies and services for women in developing countries around the world.”

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Things you should know: As the advice on this page has been prepared without considering your objectives, financial situation or needs, you should, before acting on the advice, consider its appropriateness to your circumstances. The commentary provided from external companies that are not a member of the Commonwealth Bank of Australia Group of Companies (the CBA Group) does not represent an endorsement, recommendation, guarantee or advice in regard to any matter.  Members of the CBA Group accept no liability for losses or damage arising from any reliance on external companies and their products, services and material. 

1 Comment

I am wondering if you really think that there is no gender equality? I know, maybe in Asia and Africa there isn't. But in Europe? USA? There are some cases when they earn less, but I still stand for the facet that there IS gender equality.